Yale architecture thesis

BERTRAM M. GORDON



Bertram M. Gordon is Professor of European History and Chair of the Social Sciences Division at Mills College. He is a member of the editorial board for the Journal of Tourism History and the Bureau of the International Commission for the History of Travel and Tourism , and serves as co-editor of the H-Travel internet discussion network. He holds a doctorate from Rutgers University and regularly teaches a course entitled "Men, Women, and Travel: Tourism in Europe Since the Renaissance." A specialist on World War II France, he has written on war-related tourism in that country and, more recently, the emergence of "mass tourism" and Mediterranean tourism.

Le Corbusier’s answer to the standardization of the construction industry was his modular. It was developed on the principles of proportions set forth by the “Golden Section” and Fibonacci sequences. However unlike his predecessors, Le Corbusier regulated his proportional schema to the realm of relative rather than absolute standards (34). “Taking man in his environment, instead of [utilizing] universals” Le Corbusier was able to quell some skeptics due to its lack of “metaphysical connotations”(35) Le Corbusier stated in his own manifesto that “man looks at the creation of architecture with his eyes, which are 5 feet 6 inches from the ground (Fig. 13).(36)” Relating the human body to Modulor enabled a “co-ordination at every level from town planning to furniture.”(37) The Modulor which consisted of “two divergent series of irrational numbers derived from the Golden Section” had its roots in the early proportional explorations by Le Corbusier in his work on the purist Villas like that of Graches (Fig. 12)(38).

Sadako Ohki, the Japan Foundation Associate Curator of Japanese Art, received her master’s and doctoral degrees in History of Art from the University of Michigan. Ohki wrote her doctoral thesis on Ike Taiga’s calligraphy, reflecting a lifelong interest in calligraphy and ink art. She contributed an essay on Taiga to Ike Taiga and Tokuyama Gyokuran: Japanese Masters of the Brush (Philadelphia Museum of Art, 2007); on British abstract artist Rebecca Salter and her interest in Japan to Rebecca Salter: Into the Light of Things (Yale Center for British Art, 2011); and on Konoe Nobutada to the magazine Orientations (2012). Her exhibitions at the Gallery include Tea Culture of Japan: “Chanoyu” Past and Present (2009), which was accompanied by an exhibition catalogue, and, most recently, the three-part exhibition Byobu: The Grandeur of Japanese Screens (2014).

Yale architecture thesis

yale architecture thesis

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