Girl scout essay

The black community in Maycomb is quite idealized, especially in the scenes at the black church and in the “colored balcony” during the trial. Lee’s portrayal of the black community isn’t unrealistic or unbelievable; it is important to point out, however, that she emphasizes all of the good qualities of the community without ever pointing out any of the bad ones. The black community is shown to be loving, affectionate, welcoming, pious, honest, hardworking, close-knit, and forthright. Calpurnia and Tom, members of this community, possess remarkable dignity and moral courage. But the idealization of the black community serves an important purpose in the novel, heightening the contrast between victims and victimizers. The town’s black citizens are the novel’s victims, oppressed by white prejudice and forced to live in an environment where the mere word of a man like Bob Ewell can doom them to life in prison, or even execution, with no other evidence. By presenting the blacks of Maycomb as virtuous victims—good people made to suffer—Lee makes her moral condemnation of prejudice direct, emphatic, and explicit.

You’re at the peak of your exciting Girl Scouting career and ready to do something big. You’re no stranger to the outdoors—you’ve been camping, hiking, canoeing—but the Ultimate Recreation Challenge is a chance to deepen your experiences. You’ll go on five adventures where you can step up your outdoor skills and do awe-inspiring things you’ve never done. You decide what you’ll do, where you’ll go, and what your goals will be. And there’s no race to earn this badge! Take time to savor each adventure—and to create the stories you’ll be telling for a lifetime.

Girl scout essay

girl scout essay

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